CASRI FORUM

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This forum focuses on the topic of phonetics and phonology. All projects related to this topic can be posted here.

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Projects related to the acquisition and use of modality will be discussed here

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Vocabulary, speech acts and discourse topics can be discussed here.

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Formulaic language, idioms, situation-bound utterances projects can be discussed in this forum section.

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Projects related to the innovative pedagogical approaches in teaching Chinese as a second language can be discussed here

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Neural mechanism of the cognitive/psychological process in the Chinese language as related to language acquisition

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  • zhiqi.gong
    Jul 12

    The CASRI research group “Formulaic language, idioms, situation-bound utterances” is seeking contributions to a journal special issue or a monograph focused on formulaicity and idiomaticity in Chinese as a foreign or second language (CFL/CSL respectively). A formulaic sequence is defined by Wray (2000, p. 465) as “a sequence, continuous or discontinuous, of words or other elements, which is, or appears to be, prefabricated: that is, stored and retrieved whole from memory at the time of use, rather than being subject to generation or analysis”. The definition is a broad one since it comprises various types of multiword formations, including collocations, idioms, conversational routines, and situation-bound utterances (SBUs). One of the main goals for foreign language learners is to acquire not only the grammar rules or single lexical units, but also “a means for knowing which of the well-formed sentences are nativelike” (Pawley & Syder, 1983, p. 194), that is, formulaic and idiomatic. Research demonstrated that learners can greatly benefit from mastering formulaic sequences and idioms, especially to increase the communicative competence. However, a growing number of studies has shown that mastering formulaic language is challenging, and that “the exact paths to follow to better teach it are still insufficiently lit” (Meunier, 2012, p. 123). The number of studies on Chinese formulas is constantly increasing. Chinese idioms ( shuyu ), in particular, have been systematically studied since the beginning of the 20th century. In recent years, the research on formulaicity and idiomaticity in CFL/CSL has primarily focused on chengyu , although mainly from a theoretical perspective (see Conti, 2019). More recently, several studies have addressed other types of Chinese formulaic sequences, including routine formulae (Taguchi et al., 2013; Yang, 2016), and SBUs (Kecskés, 2016). Nevertheless, research on formulaicity and idiomaticity in CFL/CSL is still at an early stage, and much must be done in terms of describing learners’ acquisition and use of various types of formulae, as well as theorizing and developing practical applications for Chinese teaching and learning. For this purpose, we especially welcome contributions based on different research methodologies (qualitative, quantitative, corpus-based, etc.) on the following aspects: Criteria for identifying learners’ formulae (nativelike or non-nativelike); Acquisition of formulae in different learning settings; Intervention studies on formulaic language teaching; Formulaic language for performing linguistic acts; Formulaic language account from a contrastive perspective; Corpus studies on formulaic language. Once we have a set of confirmed authors, we will make a formal proposal to editors. Please submit your proposals by filling up the form available on the CASRI website (http://www.caslarcenter.com/projects/casri/274-casri-form-2) and sending it to the following addresses: sergio.conti@uniroma3.it zhiqi.gong@yahoo.com Tentative Key deadlines are as follows: CASRI form submission: July 31, 2019 Abstract submission: August 31, 2019 Initial confirmation with a title/abstract: September 15, 2019 Proposal to editors: October 1, 2019 Expected first draft paper due to the editors: February, 2020 Submission language: English We look forward to your participation in this project. Kind regards, Sergio Conti Roma Tre University sergio.conti@uniroma3.it Zhiqi Gong zhiqi.gong@yahoo.com References: Conti, S. (2019). Chengyu. Caratteristiche e apprendimento delle espressioni idiomatiche cinesi . Padova: libreriauniversitaria.it edizioni. Kecskés, I. (2016). Situation-bound utterances in Chinese. East Asian Pragmatics, 1 (1), 107-126. Meunier, F. (2012), Formulaic language and language teaching. Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, 32 , 111-129. Pawley, A., & Syder, F. H. (1983). Two puzzles for linguistic theory: Nativelike selection and nativelike fluency. J. C. Richards & R. W. Schmidt (Eds.), Language and Communication (p. 191-226). New York: Longman. Taguchi, N., Li S., & Xiao F. (2013). Production of formulaic expressions in L2 Chinese: A developmental investigation in a study abroad context. CASLAR 2013, 2 (1), 23-58. Wray A. (2000). Formulaic sequences in second language teaching: Principles and practice. Applied Linguistics , 21 (4), 2000, 463-489. Yang. J. (2016). CFL learners’ recognition and production of pragmatic routine formulae. Chinese as a Second Language, 51 (1), 29-61.
  • albanyedu
    Mar 4

    Current endorsed research topics: 1. What language content and development comes naturally from working in a particular curriculum area, e.g. general science, at a particular age/grade level: · The language of the content (Coyle’s ‘language for learning’) · The in-room language needed for the teaching and assessing the learning (Coyle’s ‘language of learning’) · The linguistic development affordances – the language forms and words/phrases available for concentrated work in order to develop linguistic competence in all skills more generally, beyond the specific topic · What this concentrated language work would consist of. 2. How can language growth be taught, monitored and built upon effectively and efficiently in a CLIL program: · What should the relationship be between CLIL content areas and developing knowledge of Chinese language? · How should language be taught and assessed in a CLIL program? · How much new language can CLIL students at (X) Level handle well over time? · What constitutes progress in language development over time in a CLIL program? · Where does understanding of Chinese language as a system (Language Awareness) fit in a CLIL program? · How should Language Awareness be taught and assessed in a CLIL program? 3. How can CLIL learners be provided with accelerated and generative literacy development that enables active engagement with printed material in CLIL from the earliest opportunity? · What is the nature of Orthographic Awareness (conceptual understanding of the Chinese writing system) that learners need to develop at different levels of schooling? · What types of Orthographic Knowledge (knowledge of specific features within the character system, e.g. components, sides etc)? · What types of classroom activity are most beneficial to developing Orthographic Awareness and Orthographic Knowledge? · How can literacy development be integrated into ongoing reading and writing activity within CLIL units of work? 4. How can dedicated language teaching and learning be effectively scoped and sequenced in a CLIL context: · Should there be a dedicated language and literacy strand to support CLIL? · If so, should such a strand be introductory or run concurrently throughout the CLIL curriculum? · What should the key components of a dedicated language awareness strand be? · How might a CLIL Language Awareness strand (curriculum) vary from a mainstream (CSL) curriculum? Are there distinctive components of a CLIL Language Awareness curriculum that distinguishes it from CSL Curriculum? *****
  • albanyedu
    Nov 28, 2018

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© 2018 Copyright CASLAR Coordinators - Dr. Zhiqi Gong & Hanh Dinh

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